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Picking a location for your future homestead

Oldoilfield14 D5

Well-known member
District 5
Texas Prepper!
Something I thought I would mention to people wanting to move someday from your urban location. Texas has had historical droughts when many of the areas where you live wouldn’t support life. Read the history of the “civil war era drought” when millions of buffalo died and locust destroyed the prairie. This drought lasted about 9 years and every reservoir in Texas would have dried.
 

Kaybek

Administrator
Texas Prepper Founder
District 13
Texas Prepper!
I definitely agree and would add it's also worth knowing some of the other historical information about the land as it pertains to weather events. Not everywhere will be dry, some may face flooding challenges for example. Another thing I was told once is to also check with the local Sherrif's office about local crime and types of issues they see.
 

AnotherTexan

Active member
District 6
For me, my planned homestead site is in Deep East, within District 6 and we mostly have flooding issues than droughts. However thanks for the advice.
 

Oldoilfield14 D5

Well-known member
District 5
Texas Prepper!
For me, my planned homestead site is in Deep East, within District 6 and we mostly have flooding issues than droughts. However thanks for the advice.
Agree that is a high resource area, I was more warning about areas west of I-45, although they say a 13th century drought lasted about 15 years and dispersed the Indians in all of East Texas
 

Survival Snake

Well-known member
District 14
In my district and surrounding districts...just ten or so years ago there was a drought that killed millions of trees, creeks and lakes dried up, etc.. It completely changed the landscape in some areas. It was horrible. Don't have to go very far back in history.
 

AnotherTexan

Active member
District 6
Agree that is a high resource area, I was more warning about areas west of I-45, although they say a 13th century drought lasted about 15 years and dispersed the Indians in all of East Texas

Jesus. How do you prepare for fifteen years of drought? Just learn to take a hit and leave.

And yeah, I remember when I was in high school the drought in East Texas was bad. Don't remember much of it as I did not pay much mind to it.
 

Oldoilfield14 D5

Well-known member
District 5
Texas Prepper!
Jesus. How do you prepare for fifteen years of drought? Just learn to take a hit and leave.

And yeah, I remember when I was in high school the drought in East Texas was bad. Don't remember much of it as I did not pay much mind to it.
You have to leave
 

AnotherTexan

Active member
District 6
Eh, I honestly being among those leaving.

I know some water conservation techniques, but fifteen years? That requires importing water, desalination, and other projects beyond the skill set of a prepper.
 

Cuteandfuzzybunnies

Member
Temporary Full Member
District 15
Texas Prepper!
Native Americans not only didn’t have wells they didn’t have irrigation from rivers or streams , damns , etc.

We could much more easily adapt to lower rainfall for 15 years although it would be costly.
 

Slightly Feral

Administrator
Texas Prepper Founder
District 13
Texas Prepper!
Negative, they where highly transient and migrated great distances depending on the season, rain fall and animals.
 

Oldoilfield14 D5

Well-known member
District 5
Texas Prepper!
A drought means no rain. Theres plenty of water under the ground
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im ta
Negative, they where highly transient and migrated great distances depending on the season, rain fall and animals.
im talking about the Caddo Indians in East Texas which lived in large communities until drought dispersed them in the 13th century the Comanche weren’t in Texas at this time
 

Oldoilfield14 D5

Well-known member
District 5
Texas Prepper!
Native Americans not only didn’t have wells they didn’t have irrigation from rivers or streams , damns , etc.

We could much more easily adapt to lower rainfall for 15 years although it would be costly.
We could adapt 75% of the groundwater is used in irrigation and we haven’t had to be efficient at it yet
 

cloudryder

Well-known member
District 5
I definitely agree and would add it's also worth knowing some of the other historical information about the land as it pertains to weather events. Not everywhere will be dry, some may face flooding challenges for example. Another thing I was told once is to also check with the local Sherrif's office about local crime and types of issues they see.
LOL When I first moved here to the new digs, I went in to the County Sherriff's Dept. to change my drivers license, I took the opportunity to chat with the Sherriff. When talked for about 30 minutes. During the conversation, he asked what made me move to Red River County. I told him a few of the reasons, one of which was the lack of industry, or university, which has a direct impact on taxes. That's when he told me that meth was the county's #1 industry...and he wasn't laffing.
When I got home afterwards, I re-read Texas' Castle Law... LOL
 

cloudryder

Well-known member
District 5
Native Americans not only didn’t have wells they didn’t have irrigation from rivers or streams , damns , etc.

We could much more easily adapt to lower rainfall for 15 years although it would be costly.
Irrigation is something that migrated north with corn and pumpkins.
 
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